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Saturday, December 27, 2008

Two New Manuscripts in One: VK 908

In July 2008, the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts (CSNTM) photographed several manuscripts in the Van Kampen collection in Orlando, Florida. VK 908 is an uncatalogued minuscule manuscript containing the Apostolos (Acts and the Catholic Epistles) and the Pauline Epistles. The manuscript consists of 185 leaves and dates from the tenth or eleventh century. Its dimensions are 24.5 x 17 centimeters.

Saturday, December 27, 2008

Two New Manuscripts in One: VK 908

In July 2008, the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts (CSNTM) photographed several manuscripts in the Van Kampen collection in Orlando, Florida. VK 908 is an uncatalogued minuscule manuscript containing the Apostolos (Acts and the Catholic Epistles) and the Pauline Epistles. The manuscript consists of 185 leaves and dates from the tenth or eleventh century. Its dimensions are 24.5 x 17 centimeters.

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Sunday, November 30, 2008

Granville Sharp’s Canon and Its Kin

I wanted to take this opportunity to announce the release of a new monograph that deals especially with the deity of Christ, and especially from a grammatical perspective. Based on my doctoral dissertation but with significantly more material and thoroughly updated, Granville Sharp’s Canon and Its Kin: Semantics and Significance was published last week by Peter Lang. If you’re familiar with Sharp’s Rule, which was articulated especially in relation to Christ’s deity, you will understand the need for Sharp’s name in the title. (This announcement is timely, too, since it’s Sharp’s birthday! He’s 274 years old.) The monograph represents about 25 years of research, off and on, and touches on some key passages such as Titus 2:13 and 2 Peter 1:1. It’s available at Amazon. But since it is an academic book, it’s pricey: $69.95.

Besides affirming the deity of Christ in both of these passages, the book deals with constructions that do not fit Sharp’s rule and thus have a different force. “Pastors and teachers” in Eph 4:11 and “apostles and prophets” in Eph 2:20 are discussed at length, for example. The fact that the book came out after Gordon Fee’s Pauline Christology has afforded me the opportunity to interact with Fee’s arguments that “our great God and Savior” refer to the Father rather than the Son. I disagree with him on this, and argue that the epithet speaks of Jesus Christ.

Unfortunately, the book had several typos in the Greek due to some font issues at the printer’s. But a corrigenda sheet will accompany each hard copy so that you can spot the errors and make the corrections. If you write to me (dbw@csntm.org), I can send you the corrigenda sheet (in case you buy a copy that was already dispatched to the reseller before the typos were detected).

Obviously, textual variants that can affect the construction in question will be dealt with in some detail. The monograph will be on sale at the Society of Biblical Literature’s annual meeting coming up in Boston later this month.

Friday, November 28, 2008

TC Notes

CSNTM has added a new feature—a page called “TC Notes.” The page will give brief updates on the work of CSNTM in terms of specific data on manuscripts. It is intended for textual scholars and students who need concrete data rather than general descriptions of our work.

Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Codex B

Codex Vaticanus (otherwise known as B or 03), is one of the more appropriately named manuscripts because its residence is currently at the Vatican in Rome. It was produced in the fourth century and is a very close relation to an even earlier manuscript, P75, which is of utmost significance in determining the original wording of the New Testament. Thus, this manuscript is regarded by many as one of the most important existing New Testament Greek manuscripts, if not the most important.

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Glasgow University Ms Gen 229

With the kind permission of Mr David Weston, keeper of the special collections at the University of Glasgow, a team from CSNTM came to Glasgow to photograph the University’s Greek New Testament manuscripts. The collection included P22, minuscules 560, 561, 562, and lectionaries 162, 239, 240, and 241. These manuscripts were photographed between 3 October and 14 October. CSNTM has been granted permission to post the images of these manuscripts on line, and this we will do, we hope, next month. Besides these eight manuscripts another was photographed: Ms Gen 229.

Sunday, October 19, 2008

Codex W

With all the recent news coverage around Washington, it seems only fitting to look at one of America’s own New Testament treasures. Few are aware that the Freer Gallery of Art, a division of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, contains a late fourth or early fifth century manuscript of the four Gospels. Though there are numerous manuscripts in the United States, few compare to the quality and date of this manuscript in Washington.

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

NT Fragments in Ann Arbor Photographed

In July, CSNTM sent two teams to photograph all the parchment and paper Greek New Testament manuscripts at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. UM boasts the largest collection of GNT MSS in North America. One out of six such MSS are housed at the university. UM allowed CSNTM to photograph all these MSS and post them on our site. It took a month of work, with more than 19,000 images shot. (Most of the manuscripts had not even been microfilmed.) As of August 6, 2008, CSNTM's high-resolution digital images are now posted. We also took UV photographs of the palimpsests and illegible leaves. We are grateful to Dr. Peggy Daub, director of the Special Collections Library of the University of Michigan, for the permission to photograph and post these images.

Monday, September 15, 2008

Codex Sinaiticus on-line

The famous codex from St. Catherine’s Monastery, Mt. Sinai, Egypt has begun to show up on the Internet. A joint project between the British Library, the University of Leipzig, the National Library in St. Petersburg, and St. Catherine’s Monastery at the base of Mt. Sinai, Egypt, has been underway for some time now. All four institutes own portions of this manuscript (with the BL owning the largest section, the complete New Testament—which, incidentally, is the oldest complete New Testament by half a millennium). The project to post these images on-line has involved new digital photography and some slick search-capable tools.

Tuesday, August 05, 2008

New Testament Text-Critical Colloquium in Münster, Germany

From August 3 through August 6, 2008, most of the world’s leading New Testament textual critics have gathered in Münster, Germany, for an important conference.