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Archive for 2009

Thursday, December 10, 2009

Glasgow Manuscript Images Posted

CSNTM announces the posting of eight New Testament manuscripts from the University Library of the University of Glasgow, Scotland. These manuscripts include P22, a third century fragment of John’s gospel. Others include GA 560, GA 561, GA 562, GA lect 162, GA lect 239, GA lect 240, and GA lect 241. The manuscripts are posted on the “Manuscripts” section of the website. CSNTM is grateful to the University of Glasgow for permission to post these images.

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

CSNTM Posts Two Uncatalogued Manuscripts from the UK

During the 2008–2009 expedition season, CSNTM photographed two previously uncatalogued manuscripts in the United Kingdom. The first, Fragment B at Christ’s College in Cambridge, is an eleventh century, two-leaf minuscule from John’s gospel. The second is a tenth century, 284-leaf gospels minscule manuscript held in a private collection. Both of these manuscripts are now posted in the “Manuscripts” portion of the website.

Thursday, August 06, 2009

Eight Newly Discovered Manuscripts from the Benaki Museum, Athens

In its Spring 2009 expedition to the Benaki Museum in Athens, CSNTM initially expected to photograph thirty catalogued Greek New Testament manuscripts. In addition to these, however, the Museum yielded eight additional, previously uncatalogued manuscripts (two minuscules, six lectionaries). CSNTM is pleased to post the images of these finds in the “Manuscripts” portion of the website.

Friday, July 31, 2009

More Albania Manuscript Images Posted

In 2007, CSNTM photographed the New Testament manuscripts in the collection of the Albanian National Archives in Tirana, Albania. The Archives have allowed the Center to upload ten percent of the total images; these have now been posted in the “Manuscripts” section of the website. In addition to the manuscripts that were previously known and catalogued, the Center photographed 28 additional manuscripts; while the identification of several of these manuscripts is still being considered, most of them are uncatalogued. CSNTM is grateful to the Albanian National Archives for their permission to post these sample images, many of them now available to the public for the first time.

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

New Images of INTF Manuscripts

In the spring of 2009, a team from CSNTM photographed several manuscripts located at the Institut für neutestamentliche Textforschung (INTF) in Münster, Germany. Although these manuscripts had been digitized previously, the earlier photgraphs were two leaves per page, while the recent photographs are higher-quality single-page images. The newly photographed manuscripts are: GA 1432, GA 2445, GA 2446, GA 2756, GA lect 2005, GA lect 2008, and GA lect 2137.

Saturday, July 04, 2009

Six More Manuscripts Have Been Posted

Christ's College, Cambridge, England: GA lect 185, GA lect 1984, GA lect 2359, GA lect 2360.

Auckland City Libraries, Auckland, New Zealand: GA 1273, GA lect 474

Monday, June 29, 2009

Newly Catalogued Scriptorium Manuscripts Now Online

Ulrich Schmid of INTF has informed CSNTM that three more manuscripts now have Gregory-Aland numbers. These are manuscripts that we photographed at the Scriptorium in Orlando, Florida in the summer of 2008. They are as follows: VK 272 is GA 2895; VK 862 is GA 2896; VK 906 is GA 2897. The images of these manuscripts are now posted.

Friday, May 08, 2009

CSNTM mentioned in Wall Street Journal

An article in the May 8, 2009 issue of the Wall Street Journal, by Alexandra Alter, discusses digital preservation of ancient manuscripts. CSNTM gets mentioned. Go here to see the article.

Friday, April 10, 2009

Manuscripts at Scriptorium Now On-Line

In the summer of 2008, a team from CSNTM went to Orlando, Florida, to photograph the Greek New Testament manuscripts at the Scriptorium. We have been granted permission to post the images of these manuscripts. See the new images under “Manuscripts.”

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

Eight Uncatalogued NT Manuscripts at the Benaki Museum

On February 23, 2009, a team of four people from the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts embarked on a trip to Greece. The primary mission was to take digital photographs of the Greek NT MSS at the Benaki Museum in Athens.

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Wednesday, April 08, 2009

Eight Uncatalogued NT Manuscripts at the Benaki Museum

On February 23, 2009, a team of four people from the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts embarked on a trip to Greece. The primary mission was to take digital photographs of the Greek NT MSS at the Benaki Museum in Athens. Dr. Pitsa Tsakona, the director of Benaki’s extensive library, has been incredibly helpful to us as we have sought to photograph these ancient scriptures for the sake of preservation and scholarship. We have less than a week to go on the task, and although we are looking forward to finishing the work we will very much miss Dr. Tsakona and the very kind staff who work with her.

Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Cataloging a New Discovery: GA 2892 and GA 2893

In December 2008, the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts posted a description of codex VK 908, a manuscript at the Scriptorium in Orlando, FL. The article discussed the contents and organization of this previously uncatalogued New Testament manuscript, which actually consists of two separate manuscripts bound together into a single codex.

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Tuesday, March 31, 2009

What Does it Mean to “Discover” a Manuscript?

In the last few years, the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts has discovered more manuscripts of the New Testament than the rest of the world combined. In the past nine months alone, CSNTM has discovered about twenty, and we are in the process of presenting our finds to the academic community.

Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Cataloging a New Discovery: GA 2892 and GA 2893

In December 2008, the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts posted a description of codex VK 908,1 a manuscript at the Scriptorium in Orlando, FL. The article discussed the contents and organization of this previously uncatalogued New Testament manuscript, which actually consists of two separate manuscripts bound together into a single codex.

Monday, January 19, 2009

P46 the Earliest Extant Witness to the Corpus Paulinum

The earliest papyrus manuscript containing most of the epistles of Paul, less the pastoral epistles, along with the book of Hebrews is from the Chester Beatty Papyri Collection known as P46. This papyrus was discovered along with P45 and P47 in the Fayum of Egypt in the ruins of an early Church. The manuscript traveled 130km north to Cairo and was broken up in two portions by a dealer. Presently, part of the papyrus is in the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin, Ireland. The other portion of the papyrus was acquired by the University of Michigan, where it is presently housed. As stated previously, this is the earliest Pauline manuscript and along with the prestige has come much scholarly debate concerning the date of the papyrus. F. G. Kenyon first suggested a third century CE date. Subsequently, Ulrich Wilcken dated the document to ca. 200 CE. More recently, Young Kyu Kim suggested a provocatively early date to the reign of Domitian in 81–96 CE. His argument was predicated upon six premises: (1) comparative literary papyri of such an early date, (2) comparative documentary papyri of an early date, (3) several unique features of the handwriting, (4) and (5) other morphologically early components, and (6) a corrector’s hand which was thought to be in several documents of the early period cumulatively convinced Kim.